Why You Should Invest In Search Engine Marketing | Fairfax Marketing Services

  • By Development Team
  • 09 Sep, 2016
SEM is a holistic term that mostly refers to search engine advertising. A Google search results page can be split into two broad categories; organic and paid search results which display listings relevant to a user’s search input. Here we are talking about the  paid search results. It’s essentially about  increasing a website’s search engine visibility through  advertising optimisation. If SEM is something you’re still on the fence about, here are a few good reasons why you should invest in it. (side note: In Australia, 93% of searches are made with Google so by advertising, we mean Google AdWords).

SEM drives targeted traffic to your website

About 75 per cent of internet users never go past the first page of search results. This means if your website shows up in the subsequent pages of search results, it’s likely not getting much organic traffic. This can be a real problem if your business has a lot of competition from local and industry-wide competitors who are on their game with organic search optimisation. If your business website is relatively new – competing with established competitors makes it even harder to get to that first page quickly. Fortunately, this can be remedied by SEM.  SEM delivers targeted traffic (i.e. visitors who have used relevant key words) that align to your business’ ad and landing page.

It’s cost-effective

Practically every marketing effort involves spending (even if you do it yourself – your time is money), but SEM is more targeted and hence cost-effective when compared with other marketing channels such as print and TV advertising, sponsorships, and product placement. Search engine optimisation, by itself, can bring about good ROI. As numerous studies have shown (like this one), pay-per-click marketing is capable of significantly boosting revenue as well.

SEM is measurable

Unlike some marketing channels, SEM can be quantified. In fact, SEM is arguably the  most measurable marketing medium since it lets you see how many conversions your funds and efforts produced. In contrast, billboards are great with brand visibility but they don’t tell you exactly how many people were convinced at any point in time to purchase the product or service being advertised. SEM tools, on the other hand, provides various information that would help your campaign. For example, (and sorry for the plug, but) Fairfax Marketing Services’ SEM  reporting tool shows your website’s landing page activity, PPC cost tally, traffic sources, and many other details that would help you make better decisions.

Majority of online users use search

Numbers show that search engines are the most popular way to look for information online. That’s not all–a staggering number of consumers (some findings say 72 per cent; others 90 per cent) actually look at online reviews before making their purchasing decisions. With so many people depending on search engines for their research and decision-making, you simply can’t miss out on what SEM can do for your business.

SEM positions you as an authority

As SEM  makes your website more ubiquitous to people interested in your subject, you are implicitly demonstrating that you are an authority in your niche. So in a way, SEM also develops your brand.

Your competitors are using SEM

SEM is now an industry because more and more companies are taking advantage of it–including your competitors. Ultimately, if your business is not yet using this channel to build a client base, you’re falling behind.
By Development Team 09 Sep, 2016
SEM is a holistic term that mostly refers to search engine advertising. A Google search results page can be split into two broad categories; organic and paid search results which display listings relevant to a user’s search input. Here we are talking about the  paid search results. It’s essentially about  increasing a website’s search engine visibility through  advertising optimisation. If SEM is something you’re still on the fence about, here are a few good reasons why you should invest in it. (side note: In Australia, 93% of searches are made with Google so by advertising, we mean Google AdWords).
By Development Team 09 Sep, 2016

The term “bounce rate” refers to the percentage of the total users who go to your website and leave after looking at only one page. If you own a website, naturally, you’d want visitors to check out your other content, or convert by joining your email newsletter and buying your product/service.

There are a couple of different ways to measure the bounce rate and we subscribe to the two major authority definitions: Google Analytics and Adobe Omniture SiteCatalyst.

When an unusual number of visitors “bounce”, however, it could mean a few things:

  • Your visitor didn’t find what they were looking for.
  • Your visitor didn’t like something about your website.
  • You’re not getting the right kind of traffic for your website.

In other words, your website, content, and/or marketing strategy  could use a bit of refocusing. Here are a few things you can do to lower your bounce rate.

By Development Team 09 Sep, 2016

Remember what we said about Google Authorship? Well, it just changed.

Search engine giant Google has decided that it will stop showing Authorship in its search results. This was recently announced by John Mueller of Google Webmaster Tools. For the uninitiated, Google Authorship is a way for content creators to link their write-ups with their Google+ profile.

This news, however, shouldn’t really come as a surprise. In December 2013, Google Webspam head Matt Cutts said the search engine will reduce the number of author photo snippets by about 15 per cent in each web search query.

During late June 2014, Google took out the author photos altogether. Mueller explained that this was done to simplify how Authorship is displayed in both desktop and mobile search results. After all, mobile devices have smaller screens so using up limited space for markup like author photo snippets doesn’t seem like a good idea.

The origins of Google Authorship can be traced to its Agent Rank patent back in 2007. The concept, as it is now, was to link online content to their authors. Each author would have their own authority rating, which would influence search results.

Authorship remained a concept until June 2011 when Google started implementing schema.org structured markup standards. It then became reality when Google+ was introduced later that month.

By Development Team 08 Aug, 2016
Want your website to do better in search rankings? Here are a few search engine optimisation tips to drive more targeted traffic to your website and improve its visibility.
By Development Team 08 Aug, 2016
If you operate a blog, you’ve probably asked yourself this question. The general consensus is that you should update your blog as frequently as you can, provided that the quality of your posts do not suffer. The answer, however, isn’t always so clear-cut. Here’s what you need to know:
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